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AIDS IN THE ARCHIVE: THE POLITICS OF HIV/AIDS IN THE AGE OF THE MEDICAL HUMANITIES
Workshop with Fiona Anderson

Fri 4 - Sat 5 May 2018 / Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday, 5pm-7pm

LUX, Waterlow Park Centre

PART 1
Workshop
Friday 4 May, 10am-6pm

This day-long workshop explores the challenges that artists, curators, and historians face when working with material relating to HIV/AIDS in public and private archives and collections. Participants, including artists, historians, archivists, curators, and activists will be invited to share their experiences working with material relating to HIV and AIDS in the context of the rapidly-expanding field of the ‘medical humanities’ and to reflect on the ethics of working with large archives with activist material or with artists’ estates in relation to their own practice. How has the expansion of the medical humanities as a discipline and as a field of artistic inquiry informed how we tell histories of HIV and AIDS? How has the work of those recording and telling histories of HIV and AIDS been impacted by the funding of research and artistic production by a biomedical research charity? Participants will share ideas and best practice and work together to develop a screening programme for a public event on these themes the following day.

There are a limited number of spaces available for this workshop. If you would like to participate, please email [email protected] with “CGII Workshop” in the subject line.

Participation in the workshop is free and lunch will be provided.

PART 2
Screening
Saturday 5 May, 5pm-7pm
Free, booking required via Eventbrite

This public screening draws upon a day-long workshop on the challenges that artists, curators, and historians face when working with material relating to HIV/AIDS in public and private archives and collections.

 

PROGRAMME

Stuart Marshall, Journey of the Plague Year, 1984, sd video, silent, loop

John Greyson, The Pink Pimpernel, 1989, sd video, sound, 32mins

Yann Beauvais, SID A IDS (AID S IDA), 1992, 16mm, silent, 5mins 30secs

David Farringdon, Gentlemen, 1988, 16mm, sound, 15mins

Jerry Tartaglia, Ecce Homo, 1989, 16mm, sound, 7mins

 

Funded by the Newcastle University Institute for Social Renewal.

 


 

Part of CRUISING GROUND II (CGII) a public programme of exhibition, writing, workshop, performance and screenings at LUX April-May 2018, engaging with some of the of the different ideas explored in the ongoing research project CRUISING GROUND. First initiated at LUX in Summer 2017 in response to the organisation’s relocation to Waterlow Park, Highgate in North London, CRUISING GROUND takes the the ponds and cruising areas of neighbouring Hampstead Heath as a departure point for exploring the methodologies of cruising as a strategy for permanent institutional destabilisation and for queering cultural mediation and production within the arts.

CRUISING GROUND and CGII have been developed and curated by Matt Carter in collaboration with Cruising the Seventies: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures (CRUSEV), a three-year pan-Europe research project exploring LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) social and sexual cultures of the 1970s and their significance for LGBTQ people across Europe now and in the future.

Video still The Pink Pimpernel, John Greyson, 1989.

About

Dr Fiona Anderson

Dr Fiona Anderson is Lecturer in Art History in the Fine Art department at Newcastle University. At the moment, she is completing a book on the art and gay cruising scenes on New York’s derelict waterfront in the years immediately preceding the HIV/AIDS epidemic, looking most closely at the work of David Wojnarowicz and Peter Hujar, and working on a new project on the culture and politics of the drug AZT.

CRUSEV

Cruising the Seventies: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures (CRUSEV) explores LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) social and sexual cultures of the 1970s, and their significance for LGBTQ people across Europe now and in the future. CRUSEV reconstructs aspects of LGBTQ cultures and interactions from the 1970s, the decade before HIV/AIDS, to consider what this knowledge can contribute to queer politics and identity in Europe’s present and future. The three-year research project is financed by the European funding agency HERA, under HERA’s ‘Uses of the Past’ theme. www.crusev.ed.ac.uk // @cruisingthe70s